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American Sign Language:  "record"


There are several different ways to sign the concept of "record." The right sign depends on your meaning.
 



If you mean "record" as in "to make a note of," then use the version of record that means "Make a note of..."

Sample usages:
"Let me put that down on paper."
"Make a note of that."
"Get this in writing."
"We need to document this."

RECORD-("make an note of")


Also see:  NOTE
 



 If you mean "record" as in "make a video recording," see: VIDEO-RECORD
 



Version:
If you mean "record" as in "set a new record or new standard for performance" then hold out your non-dominant flat hand, palm down, (lay it in front of you in the air, pointing off to your dominant side. Then take your dominant hand and form it into a fist and hold your dominant forearm in the air a couple inches above the non-dominant hand and quickly, firmly bring the elbow down onto the back of the palm-down non-dominant hand (think of planting a flag).
See: (under construction)
 



Version:
If you mean "record" as in "my grandma likes to listen to vinyl records," then hold out your non-dominant flat hand, palm up.  Make an "X-hand" with your dominant hand. Use the "X-hand" like a "needle" (old fashioned record arm) and circle it around the non-dominant hand as if representing the turning of a record on a record player.
See: (under construction)
 



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